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You have to prioritize yourself

The Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance states that “Major depressive disorder affects approximately 14.8 million American adults, or about 6.7 percent of the U.S. population age 18 or older, in each year.”

Mental health is not a surprising concept in 2018, and many people find themselves suffering with these things whether it be from depression, ADHD or anxiety. There are groups of people who find when they struggle with these mental illnesses they want to help those who are facing the same problems.

When you open your mind and allow yourself to take some of the weight off others, you are forced to decide if you are now ready to bear all their weight.

According to healthyway.com “Irritability is one of the lesser known symptoms of depression, but it’s textbook one that can typically have characterized as “quick to anger, quick to tears.” When you invite people into your life you are allowing yourself to be opened to the problems that they are dealing with. When situations like this arise, people are fearful that they will be the bad guy If they take a step back and realize that are unable to focus on someone else.

If you find yourself going through a recovery of your own, or in general trying to be a happier person and you find it difficult to accomplish these goals with friends that are always hurting or suffering without the goal of happiness, you are okay to separate yourself from these people.

Throughout life you will hit points that are harder to deal with and with this you need to understand that you are the your number one priority. If you are suffering because you are worried about someone else, and it is hurting your recovery, you need to step away.

There is no reason to risk a relapse in your life for anyone.

When you take a step away from a friend that is hurting it does not mean that you are a terrible friend or that you are no longer there for them. It means you have hit the point where you have to care of yourself.

In the book “An Invitation to Self-Care” by Tracey Cleantis, Danielle Keopke is quoted saying “You don’t ever have to feel guilty about removing toxic people from your life. It doesn’t matter whether someone is a relative, romantic interest, employer, childhood friend, or a new acquaintance- you don’t have to make room for people who causes you pain or make you feel small.”

You can love someone and decide that you no longer need them in your life. The only way to win in a toxic friendship is to no longer be involved with it.

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